I Judge You When You Use Poor Grammar

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I Judge You When You Use Poor Grammar: A Collection of Egregious Errors, Disconcerting Bloopers, and Other Linguistic Slip-Ups

by Sharon Eliza Nichols

This  collection of linguistically impaired signs includes dangling modifiers, apostrophe errors, misspellings, and other amusing misadventures. As a coffee table book, it is sure to get a few laughs.

Here are some examples: Continue reading “I Judge You When You Use Poor Grammar”

Get to the Point

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Get to the Point: Painless advice for writing memos, letters, and e-mails your colleagues and clients will understand

by Elizabeth Danziger

Elizabeth Danziger’s advice on using clear, clutter-free language is consistent with the classic On Writing Well by William Zinsser, but this book is more useful as manual, whereas Zinsser’s book is more conceptual.

When is it appropriate to use which or that? The author provides an informal “just do it” rule and a formal “grammar police” rule. Continue reading “Get to the Point”

Lapsing Into a Comma

Lapsing Into a Comma: A Curmudgeon’s Guide to the Many Things That Can Go Wrong in Print—and How to Avoid Them

by Bill Walsh

The Internet and print-on-demand technology have enabled almost everyone to become a publisher. In traditional media, professional journalists and authors have their writing cleaned up by copy editors before it is published. The average blogger does not have this luxury.  In Lapsing Into a Comma, Bill Walsh shares his advice on how to handle many common problems that he has encountered as copy editor of the business section at the Washington Post. Continue reading “Lapsing Into a Comma”